Schema Markup News July 9th, 2019

We’ve curated some of the big news surrounding schema markup for the week to help you stay on top of changes:

DataSet 

Datasets are easier to find when you provide supporting information such as their name, description, creator and distribution formats as structured data. Google’s approach to dataset discovery makes use of schema.org and other metadata standards that can be added to pages that describe datasets.

A common sense view of Knowledge Graphs   

The semantic Web community not infrequently engages in such bursts of definition and vocabulary harangues. For a community ostensibly focused on ‘semantics’, definitions and terminology disputes sometimes seem all too common. Still, the interest in knowledge graphs (KGs) is quite real and represents an important visibility point for the semantic Web.

A guide to implementing Google’s “How-to” schema 

Google is always looking for the best ways to provide the most useful results to users. It’s what has allowed Google to dominate the search engine market for so long and, it has kept the SEO industry evolving.

Reports Of Google Traffic Loss After Implementing FAQ Schema

A month ago, Google launched their FAQ schema which essentially gave you a way to markup your FAQ content and Google would show those FAQs in the search results snippets.

Google Allows Emojis, Links & Unicode In FAQ Rich Results – For Now…

Google launched FAQ schema at Google I/O and we have learned that implementing can result in a drop in traffic. So what can you do to increase clicks? Maybe drop links, emojis and unicode in your schema so that they show up in the FAQ rich results in Google search.

49% of all Google searches are no-click, study finds

The data also showed that, in the first quarter of 2019, 41.45% of Google searches resulted in organic clicks to non-Google sites and 5.9% of searches ended with the user heading to another Google-owned web site. When looking at just the searches that resulted in a click, 12% went to Google-owned sites. For more information you can check out:

How Much of Google’s Search Traffic is Left for Anyone But Themselves?

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